Munro, Douglas Albert, SM1c
Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Petty Officer First Class (E-6)
Last Primary Rate
SM-Signalman
Last Rate Group
Signalman
Last Duty Station
1941-1942, SM, USS Hunter Liggett (AP-27)
Service Years
1939 - 1942
SM-Signalman
One Hash Mark

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

31 kb

Home Country
Canada
Canada
Year of Birth
1919
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Loyde Mcillwain (TWS Tech Manager), GM3 to remember Munro, Douglas Albert, PO1.

If you knew or served with this Coast Guardsman and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Vancouver, British Columbia
Last Address
USS Hunter Liggett

Casualty Date
Sep 27, 1942
 
Cause
Hostile, Died of Wounds
Reason
Gun, Small Arms Fire
Location
Solomon Islands
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Laurel Hill Memorial Park - Cle Elum, Washington
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

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World War II Fallen
  1942, World War II Fallen

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 Duty Stations
US Navy
  1941-1941, SM, USS Mccawley (APA-4)
  1941-1942, SM, USS Hunter Liggett (AP-27)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1939-1945 Guadalcanal-Tulagi landings Campaign/Battle of Savo Island
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

DOUGLAS ALBERT MUNRO, SIGNALMAN FIRST CLASS, U.S. COAST GUARD



For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry in action above and beyond the call of duty as Officer-in-Charge of a group of Higgins boats, engaged in the evacuation of a Battalion of Marines trapped by enemy Japanese forces at Point Cruz, Guadalcanal, on September 27, 1942. After making preliminary plans for the evacuation of nearly 500 beleaguered Marines, Munro, under constant risk of his life, daringly led five of his small craft toward the shore. As he closed the beach, he signalled the others to land, and then in order to draw the enemy's fire and protect the heavily loaded boats, he valiantly placed his craft with its two small guns as a shield between the beachhead and the Japanese. When the perilous task of evacuation was nearly completed, Munro was killed by enemy fire, but his crew, two of whom were wounded, carried on until the last boat had loaded and cleared the beach. By his outstanding leadership, expert planning, and dauntless devotion to duty, he and his courageous comrades undoubtedly saved the lives of many who otherwise would have perished. He gallantly gave up his life in defense of his country.



   
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